Being ill shouldn't be termed as a war or a battle

It’s time to surrender the language of war when it comes to our health

Not everyone “wins” their “fight” and terming it as such suggests that anyone who succumbs to the disease has “lost” it; the implication being that they just didn’t fight hard enough

DNA double helices

Autistic voices speak out about “concerning” new research study

We’ve come a long way from the days of unethical experimentation on – and routine institutionalisation of – autistic people, but critics of the Spectrum10K study fear it has murky … Continue reading Autistic voices speak out about “concerning” new research study

Noel Conway at home with his ventilator on

The assisted dying debate

As another prominent right to die campaigner dies, Tannice Hemming looks at the UK’s attitude towards assisted dying. Noel Conway was 71 when he died last week. Diagnosed with Motor … Continue reading The assisted dying debate

Where did Coronavirus come from?

What credence is there to the theory that Covid-19 escaped from a laboratory and why has Joe Biden ordered an investigation? Tannice Hemming examines what is already known about the origins of Coronavirus and looks at the evidence behind what some are convinced is just a conspiracy theory.

Fighting the Covid-deniers, one fact at a time

A new website vows to tackle what it calls Covid scepticism in whatever form it takes. Run by a team including a psychologist, a Conservative MP and a Superforecaster, Covidfaq.co … Continue reading Fighting the Covid-deniers, one fact at a time

The long and difficult road to recovery – why Coronavirus isn’t always over in a fortnight

More and more evidence is coming to light that “long Covid”, as it’s commonly known amongst people battling it, is not just in their heads. Despite the stigma of the longer term suffering and the reported ignorance from the healthcare professionals they have struggled to gain recognition from, prominent voices from the medical community are finally looking into this phenomena.

2 women - one is a patient, the other is a medical profession. The patient is holding her face clearly in distress. The overlaid text says "simply hysterical'?

“Women’s issues” – written off, ignored and mocked for too long

Women are used to being called hysterical. The very word itself comes from the Greek word, hysterika, meaning uterus. If you’re hysterical, your behaviour is marked by “uncontrollable, extreme emotion”.